Dub poetry is a form of performance poetry of West Indian origin, which evolved out of Dub Music consisting of spoken word over reggae rhythms in Jamaica in the 1970s. Unlike Deejaying (also known as toasting), which also features the use of the spoken word, the dub poet’s performance is normally prepared, rather than the extemporized chat of the Dancehall Deejaying In musical setting, the dub poet usually appears on stage with a band performing music specifically written to accompany each poem, rather than simply perform over the top of dub plates, or riddim, in the dancehall fashion. Musicality is built into dub poems, yet, dub poets generally perform without backing music, delivering chanted speech with pronounced rhythmic accentuation and dramatic stylization of gesture. Sometimes dub music effects, e.g. echo, reverb, are dubbed spontaneously by a poet into live versions of a poem. Many dub poets also employ call-and-response devices to engage audiences.Dub poetry is mostly of an overtly political and social nature, with none of the braggadocio often associated with the dancehall. The odd love-song or elegy appears, but dub poetry is predominantly concerned with politics and social justice, commonly voiced through a commentary on current events (thus sharing these elements with dancehall and “conscious” or “roots” reggae music).