Most Popular Songs

   Blood Again

   The Plain Land

   The World Is A Cycle

   Marijuana

Bookings and Current Status

Birth Name Richell Bonner
Origin Saint Andrew Parish, Jamaica
Genres Reggae
Instruments Vocals
Years active Late 1990s–Present
Labels Heartbeat, VP, Bonner Cornerstone

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

When his single “Earth a Run Red” quickly began ascending the charts in 2004, first in Jamaica and then internationally, Richie Spice took the reggae community by storm. Fresh, well-crafted, lyrically uplifting – it ultimately emerged as one of the year’s biggest hits… all despite being over four years old.

“Earth a Run Red” was originally released on Spice’s debut album “Universal” by Massachusetts-based label, Heartbeat Records in 2000. At that time, Richie Spice was simply a lone reggae warrior. “The songs were there,” he says, “but they weren’t getting any promotion – with me just going out there and singing them, it was like one man against the world.”

When his single “Earth a Run Red” quickly began ascending the charts in 2004, first in Jamaica and then internationally, Richie Spice took the reggae community by storm. Fresh, well-crafted, lyrically uplifting – it ultimately emerged as one of the year’s biggest hits… all despite being over four years old.

“Earth a Run Red” was originally released on Spice’s debut album “Universal” by Massachusetts-based label, Heartbeat Records in 2000. At that time, Richie Spice was simply a lone reggae warrior. “The songs were there,” he says, “but they weren’t getting any promotion – with me just going out there and singing them, it was like one man against the world.”
Born Richell Bonner in the Kingston suburb of St Andrew, JA, Richie Spice came from a family with a history of music. There was his older brother, Pliers, of deejay/singer duo Chaka Demus and ‘Murder She Wrote’ fame. But it was brother, singer Spanner Banner (best known for his mid-nineties hit “Life Goes On” and now a member of the 5th Element record family) who initially brought young Spice to the recording studio. Although the hopeful singer didn’t get the opportunity to record there, it opened his eyes to the proficiency that is required to succeed in the reggae industry. “It was a strong learning experience,” he recalls. “I tried to record but it seemed like maybe I just wasn’t ready. But it show me that there is a lot of work to be done so you just do what is necessary until you reach that space where you are supposed to be.” And so the young reggae soldier marched on.

In 2004, Kingston-based 5th Element finally began a vigorous promotional campaign for “Earth a Run Red” in Jamaica, pushing the track onto the airwaves and into the dancehalls and quickly following it with the Ras Kassa directed video, bringing Spice’s incredible talent even further into the light. It wasn’t long before Richie Spice was the most sought after artist across the island. “Ghetto Girl,” the ominous “Folly Living,” the resounding herbal hymn, “Marijuana” – his 5th Element debut, the critically-acclaimed “Spice in Your Life” album created a tidal wave of hits in 2006, being named one of the New York Times best reggae albums of the year. The Los Angeles Times went one further, citing it as one of the year’s ten best album of any musical genre. Meanwhile, back in JA, The Observer was honoring Spice as Artist and Vocalist of the year. It gave the warrior wings…
That year, Billboard Magazine ranked Richie Spice among the top live performers – his riveting stage presence ignited the crowds. His singles were soaring through the top of the charts. In fact, to reach Spice’s rapidly-growing international fanbase, the 5th Element family joined forces with VP Records in order to release Richie’s next big album, 2007’s “In the Streets of Africa.” His music has since thundered through the industry, traversing across multiple genres and into the hearts of musicians and music-lovers alike. Spice’s top tracks have been remixed by a legion of producers worldwide. And now with UTH Music, songs like “Jah Provide” (featured on his acoustic 2012 album, Soaring Sounds) and “Mama,” Richie Spice’s latest release, continue to push reggae into new territory.

Spice’s appealing brand of roots reggae is characterized by smoothly delivered, impassioned vocals that lovingly caress such as in the boomshot, “Brown Skin.” Or when needed, they deliver the militant urgency of a righteous rebel soldier as they do in “Open the Door”. Guided by the principles of his Rastafarian way of life, Spice’s lyrics rail against injustice and the plight of the oppressed. They implore assistance for the youth and extend due respect to women everywhere. “My responsibility is to use the talent that God gave me as an instrument to uplift people who are facing the struggle worldwide and let them feel happy in themselves,” Spice explains. “It is all about spreading the love of the people, good over evil and life over death.” It is a battle which is not yet over. And so the reggae warrior forges on…

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